Year in Review: 2018 Expenses

2018 was the year I took my money goals seriously – they shifted a bit but it in they end I made huge financial strides.

It was the first full year of tracking my expenses – something I started in mid-2017 – so it’ll provide major insights for every year moving forward.

This year I spent $16,361.93, funded my emergency fund with $10,000, and paid $11,017.18 towards my student loans.

Below is a breakdown of how much I spent for every category.

Continue reading “Year in Review: 2018 Expenses”

Trip Summary: Iceland

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We snagged cheap tickets for Iceland back in April. October is considered low season so it wasn’t a surprise that ticket costs weren’t high. Traveling during this time gave us a greater opportunity to see the Northern Lights, but made me seriously paranoid about hitting bad weather. Continue reading “Trip Summary: Iceland”

Work Trip + #NoSpendWeek – November Expenses

In May 2017 it hit me that I had spent the last year and a half in a full-time salaried position, plus 9 years before that working for money. Yet, I had no idea what my income had brought me. I wasn’t saving for retirement, I didn’t have a freedom fund, and I still had student loans! Where was all the money I had ever made? Was I spending based on my values?

This prompted me to start tracking every single purchase. I wanted to know exactly where my money was going. I wanted to start building wealth, but in order to start, I needed to understand my spending trends.

The #MonthlyExpenses segment is an effort to keep myself accountable for my purchases and on track for my savings and debt payoff goals. Continue reading “Work Trip + #NoSpendWeek – November Expenses”

The True Cost of Living in My Parents’ Basement

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love me some colorful doors

“You’re being so smart. Don’t move out until you have enough for a mortgage!”

“You’re so lucky to have parents’ that live so close.”

“Oh my, I’d have all debts paid off I lived with my parents!”

Well, most of the time I strongly agree with these statements. I mean, let’s be real, moving back in with your parents isn’t so bad when they live in the suburbs of a major metropolitan city, there’s public transportation only a few steps away, and they love and accept you.

But now that summer is officially over and traffic is back to miserable, my commute is getting the best of me. My patience is running out and I have never been more ready to GTFO. Time is money, so why am I okay justifying a two-hour commute for my savings?

Continue reading “The True Cost of Living in My Parents’ Basement”